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Cat 5E & 6 Tutorial
All About CAT 6A
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Cat 5E / 5 Patch Cable

How to Make
Category 6 Patch Cable

Installing Cat 5E/6E Shielded Modular Plugs
How to Terminate
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How to Wire Phone Jack
LED Technology
MTP Fiber Optic Plug and Play Solution
Fiber Optic Tutorial
  • Fiber Optic Jargon
  • Fiber Optic Basics
  • Fiber Optic Fiber
  • Fiber Optic Testing
  • Fiber Optic Cable
  • Fiber Optic Network
  • Fiber Optic Estimating
  • Fiber Optic Training
  • Fiber Termination
  • Fiber Optic Glossary
Mode Conditioning
Pulling Fiber Optic & Communication Cables
Designing Conduit Runs





1) Planning the Run:

1a) Underground Conduits: We recommend that underground conduits, if newly installed, should be a minimum size of between 1.5" to 2". If the run is long, or if you anticipate the possibility of additional future pulls; Then you may want to install a conduit of up to 4" (or greater). Once the trench is dug, the installation of the conduit is comparably easy and inexpensive. You may also want to consider installing additional conduits for future use.

1b) Conduit Installations General Information:
  • Try to design the conduit run with a few bends as possible. If there are too many bends in the run then you may consider installing junction boxes in lieu of bends. Note: There is some controversy on installing junction boxes in lieu of bends. Read more information.
  • Use plastic bushings on conduit ends to avoid damage to the cable during the pull.

1c) In Buildings: It is not necessary to pull fiber optic cable in innerduct. Innerduct is strictly a personal preference. The following instruction takes into consideration that you will pull the fiber optic cable directly into the ceiling or other space. Plan for straight pulls only (point A to point B). Diagonal pulling across an area will be OK but it would make for a neater and more professional installation to install the cable at an angle that is parallel to a wall. Do not attempt to pull the cable around a corner, even if you plan on having a person feeding it from hand to hand around the corner. Instead, pull all of the cable out (at the turn) and lay it on the floor in a figure 8 pattern (See Installing - item #2e below).




Multimode

 


10-GiG Multimode

 


Singlemode

 

Indoor (Plenum)

4 Strand
6 Strand
12 Strand
24 Strand
4 Strand
6 Strand
12 Strand
24 Strand
4 Strand
6 Strand
12 Strand
24 Strand

Indoor / Outdoor

4 Strand
6 Strand
12 Strand
24 Strand
4 Strand
6 Strand
12 Strand
24 Strand
48 Strand
4 Strand
6 Strand
12 Strand
24 Strand

Indoor / Outdoor Interlock Armor

 

6 Strand
12 Strand
- -

Outdoor

4 Strand
6 Strand
12 Strand
24 Strand
- 4 Strand
6 Strand
12 Strand
24 Strand

Outdoor With Messenger

6 Strand
12 Strand
24 Strand
- 6 Strand
12 Strand
24 Strand

2 Strand Fiber Whips

 

2 Strand 2 Strand 2 Strand


2) Installing the cable:

2a) Rope Size: It is important to use a rope size that give minimal stretching during the pull. Stretching of the rope is undesirable for several reasons including that it makes for a very unstable pull, and takes away control from those doing the pulling. This is why we do not recommend using 200 lb. pull string (aka: jetline) to pull the cable. We recommend a heavier rope that is anywhere from a 1/4" to 1/2" in thickness. The thickness of the rope should increase with greater pull lengths. Have the pull rope installed before the cable pulling crew arrives for maximum efficiency.

2b) Communication between the person feeding and the person pulling the cable is absolutely essential. If the person feeding runs into a snag then the puller must stop immediately to avoid damage to the cable. Walkie-talkies would come in handy for this purpose. Use of great pulling force is not recommended and will likely damage the terminations and/or the cable.

2c) Use a generous amount of cable pulling lubricant on the entire run, especially on the leader (pulling eye & mesh). The person may stop the cable pull from time to time to prepare and apply more lubricant. Use only lubricant that is expressly designed for cable pulling. When working in freezing temperatures, use a lubricant that is designed not to freeze.

2d) Do make every effort to pull cables from a conduit in as straight an angle as possible. Pulling on an angle can cause damage to the cable.



2e) How to Handle Slack: When pulling cable out from a conduit or ceiling, it will become necessary to coil up the cable in preparation to pull it in another direction. Fiber Optic cable has a "memory". That is to say that it holds it's contour that it formed while being on a reel. Do not try to re-coil the cable in a circular pattern; Instead use a figure - 8 pattern as shown in the illustration. When you are finished pulling out all of the slack, turn the figure - 8 cable 360°n(upside down) and proceed to setup to pull it in the other direction.



2f) Removing the Pull Eye: Use extreme caution when removing the pull eye. Do not use a blade to slit the mesh. Instead, use a pair of electricians scissors or diagonal cutters. Work your way from the back of the cable toward the pull eye, while lifting the mesh upward, away from the cable.

2g) Follow Building Codes: Always obey all local, and national, fire and building codes. Be sure to "firestop" all cables that penetrate a firewall. Use plenum rated cable where it is mandated, etc., etc.


Pre-Terminated Fiber Optic Cable Assemblies

These factory pre-terminated fiber-optic cable assemblies (aka: "Ready Pull") have received rave reviews from our customers . The assemblies can be ordered in either indoor (plenum) or outdoor versions, and in 4, 6, 12 or 24 strand fiber counts, and in multimode or Singlemode! A pulling eye can be factory installed on either end or on both ends of the cable. The pulling eye (and associated cable netting) will protect the pre-terminated ends during the pull. This product is a great time and money saver for those who occasionally install fiber optic cabling.


Important Ordering Information

1) Cable Jacket Types

Indoor (Plenum): The cable is rated for all indoor installations, including plenum rated spaces. A cable rated for plenum installation will have low-smoke characteristics as defined by the NFPA (National Fire Protection Agency).

Outdoor: Outdoor cables are filled with a water blocking jell and are rated for all outdoor applications except for "direct bury". This cable is suitable for underground installation in conduit, overhead lashed to a guy wire, or secured to a building or other permanent outdoor structure. The drawback of the jell-filled cable is that it is mandated at a maximum of 50 feet run indoors due to fire-code regulations. Please note that the only difference between outdoor (jell-filled) and direct bury cable is that the latter has an added overall metallic sheath which gives it protection from rodents. If you require a direct bury cable, please contact sales for a quote.

Indoor/Outdoor: Indoor/Outdoor cables are approved for use in underground conduits, even if the possibility of water infiltration exists. Indoor/Outdoor cables are not recommended for aerial installations. The advantage of using Indoor/Outdoor over standard Outdoor cable is that it does not have the 50 foot restriction for indoor installation that standard outdoor cable has. This cable has an overall PVC sheath and is not rated for plenum spaces.


Mating Sleeves

Best quality long wearing zirconia alignment sleeve for precise dependable connections. Good for both Multimode and Singlemode. Industry standard mounting.


2) Running Through Different Environments

Say for example that you have a cable run that will go from building A to building B. In building A, there is a 100 foot run through a plenum space. Then the cable must run overhead from pole to pole for a distance of 550 feet to building B. In building B, the cable must be run for a distance of 150 feet through a plenum space. Obviously, this cannot be done with a single cable. The way to do this is with three separate cables. The pre-terminated cables can be joined together in buildings A & B by the use of Fiber Optic Distribution boxes. See diagram below:



3) How To Take An Accurate Measurement

It is extremely important to take an accurate measurement when planning an order for a custom pre-terminated fiber optic cable assembly. These custom assemblies cannot be returned unless out of box defective.

We recommend that you fish through a small (200 lb. rated) polypropylene pull string from end to end (termination point to termination point). The string should follow the exact path and be shaped to the run in the exact way that the final cable will be installed, from end to end. At each termination end, shape the string over to the termination point and add at least 15 feet and cut the string. Once this has been done on both ends the string should be removed. You may want to replace the string with a heavier rope for later pulling of the cable (see installation recommendations item #2 below). Once the string is removed, take an accurate measurement and record it. It is always better to have a cable that is longer than shorter for obvious reasons. Slack coils of the cable may be put by each termination point.


4) Pulling Eye Recommendations

Optional pulling eyes are highly recommended. The pulling eye pulling eye (and associated cable netting) will protect the pre-terminated ends during the pull. In many cases, pulling is not done from point to point, but rather from an intermediate point pulling back in each direction to each termination location. In that scenario, you will need to order the cable with two pulling eyes. In many cases, a cable run is planned to pull direct from point to point. When the installation begins, occasionally, the decision is made to pull from an intermediate point rather than from point to point (in which case you'll be glad that you ordered the extra pulling eye).







Featured Pre-Terminated Fiber Optic Cable Assemblies





The information on this page is an original copyrighted article. We welcome you to link this page from your website. However, copying this article in whole or in part is strictly prohibited.

Disclaimer: We have provided this article as general installation advice to our customers. We make no claims about the completeness or the accuracy of the information as it may apply to an infinite amount of field conditions. It is the responsibility of the person or persons using this information to check with all concerned parties, owners and local authorities, etc. before doing an installation. Users of this information agree to hold Atcom Inc. harmless form liabilities of any kind relating to the use of this information.


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